First steps into the world of Nim

I was recently doing a bit of reading up on the Rust programming language, but a stray comment somewhere about the Nim programming language sent me off on a bit of a tangent. The thing that really got me interested in Nim was that it compiles to C, and I noticed that this brings quite some options for portability. One of the reasons why I like programming in C is that you can run the code on all kinds of machines, from tiny embedded devices to supercomputers. But that does come at a cost, because it takes longer and you often have lots more typing to do because of all that boilerpate stuff.

But it looks like Nim would allow you to be quite productive, whilst the resulting executables should still be efficient and fast. To get some ideas, I went off to Rosetta Code and found the Nim code for a simple webserver which looks like this:

import asynchttpserver, asyncdispatch
 
proc cb(req: Request) {.async.} =
  await req.respond(Http200, "Hello, World!")
 
asyncCheck newAsyncHttpServer().serve(Port(8080), cb)
runForever()

Being able to create a webserver with just a few lines of code, and with the potential for the code to be portable and run on all kinds of devices seemed very tempting! By this point, I'd forgotten about Rust and wanted to explore Nim a bit further.

So whilst Nim has not reached v1.0 yet, it certainly looked very compelling. The compiler documentation made it look like cross-compilation was not that difficult, so I decided to try and cross-compile some code for a router running OpenWrt. Before going off and spendng a lot of time learning a new language, I wanted to see that I *really* can write portable code. I was very happy to see that in just a few minutes I had the example webserver code running on my TP-Link WR740N, as shown here:

To my amazement and joy, this really wasn't that hard. After installing Nim, I had to edit Nim/config/nim.cfg to point to my cross-compile toolchain, so I ended up with these lines:

mips.linux.gcc.exe =
 "/home/openwrt/openwrt/staging_dir/toolchain-mips_34kc_gcc-4.8-linaro_uClibc-0.9.33.2/
bin/mips-openwrt-linux-gcc"
mips.linux.gcc.linkerexe =
 "/home/openwrt/openwrt/staging_dir/toolchain-mips_34kc_gcc-4.8-linaro_uClibc-0.9.33.2/
bin/mips-openwrt-linux-gcc"

Then, after doing that I simply needed to pass the correct parameters to the Nim compiler, like this:

nim c --cpu:mips --os:linux webserver.nim

Which cross-compiled the example webserver ready for it to run on my TP-Link WR740N. That actually seems pretty awesome. I think that I need to learn more, perhaps I'll even go and buy the Nim in Action book. All this stuff worked perfectly without any trouble, which is pretty rare, so I am left feeling very impressed so far.

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