LED blink program for Vocore + Dock

Having gotten one of the Vocore’s LEDs to blink from the command line, I decided that a simple C program to do the same thing would be useful, just to make sure that the cross-compiler has been set up correctly and that everything is working properly.

Having a program that just blinks an LED is pretty useful, just to verify that you can successfully run your code. If you’ve managed to cross-compile a test program like this, then copy it to the target hardware and see it working - then you can start building whatever you like with a degree of confidence.

So I’ve put the code for the Vocore blink program on GitHub just in case… NOTE: it’s designed to work without any additional electronics if you have the dock attached.

The project includes a simple Makefile which (hopefully) should work in most cases. As long as you have an OpenWrt build environment set up for the Vocore you should just be able to type make and you will then have the program cross-compiled and ready to be copied onto the device. Doing something like: scp ./blink root@192.168.61.1:/ should copy the program over to your Vocore. Once you’ve done that, you just need to ssh into the Vocore and run it.

Oh, you’ll probably need to make sure that the program has been marked executable with chmod, otherwise you’ll probably get a Permission denied message. I used chmod +x blink to do that.

Vocore has arrived

My tiny Vocore Linux machine has arrived from China. Cool! So far all I have not done much more than boot it up and check that I can log in and stuff. Oh, and I tried the web-based interface too. It seems to be working fine. A Linux box about the size of a postage stamp, what’s not to like?

Mine has the dock attached to it, so I’m just using a USB cable to power the device. I tried to power it off a USB socket on my MacBook … but there wasn’t enough current to allow the wifi to start. Some lights flashed on the Vocore initially, but then it went off a few seconds later. I think that this means that there is not enough current to allow the wifi to start operating… But when I ran it of a dedicated USB power supply it was fine.

Because I have the dock, I used an ethernet cable to connect to the Vocore, which means my laptop can remain connected to my home wifi and I can still use the Vocore with its default settings.

But when sitting in front of the command prompt I got as far as making some LEDs go on and off with commands like these:

echo 255 > /sys/devices/gpio-leds.5/leds/vocore:green:status/brightness
echo 0 > /sys/devices/gpio-leds.5/leds/vocore:green:status/brightness

The advantage of doing that is that they use an LED which has already been connected up on the dock … so I didn’t need to wire anything up. I’m going to try the same thing in a little C program next. Blinking an LED is an ideal little test program

The next thing that I’ll do is try my own minimal webserver, which might be useful if I start running out of space. So that’s next on my agenda.

Apart from that, I’m not really sure what I’m going to use it for. I’m sure I’ll think of something...

Who's got a blinking Pi?

So, one of the things that I wanted to do with the Raspberry Pi was to control the GPIO pins from C# (Mono). What I decided to do was to write a shared library in C and then use native library interop from Mono to call the C code.

Anyway, the first step was to write the library in C and then call it from another C program. What I have done is basically copy the example from here, but write the actual GPIO access as a shared library. Currently, I'm simply copying the resulting .so file into /lib.

It wasn't that hard to do, I was quite surprised. Here is the working library running on a Raspberry Pi:

When I've had a bit more time to play with it and tidy up some things I will post the source code, probably in a few day time I expect. But the next step is to check that it works from Mono, but I don't see any reason why it shouldn't.